NRU still dilly-dallying on Kwaaikie’s racial slur

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Carlos Kambaekwa

Windhoek – Almost half a year has lapsed and the powers that be at Lichtenstein Strasse in Olympia, south of Windhoek, are still dilly-dallying on summoning disgraced Wanderers rugby club flanker Theo Coetzee – aka ‘Kwaaikie’ – for a disciplinary hearing.

Coetzee is at the centre of a widely publicised racial incident, in which he was accused of having made derogatory remarks against an opponent in a South African Provincial Club Rugby Championship, the Gold Cup, during a match against the visiting Northam Platinum Rhinos in September last year.

The ensuing brouhaha of Coetzee’s widely reported racial attack leveled against a black South African rugby player, one Patrick Malumba, was widely condemned by the general sports community; even the Swapo Party Youth League (SPYL) zoomed in on the matter.

SPYL demanded a thorough investigation and if found guilty, that sanctions be instituted against the culprit by the country’s rugby presiding body, the National Rugby Union (NRU).

The National Sports Commission (NSC) also wrote to NRU calling on the union to act.
In the meantime, persuaded by sustained pressure from the media, notably New Era, Wanderers eventually charged the accused, whereupon he was found guilty of gross misconduct by using inappropriate language towards a fellow athlete.

It’s alleged the foulmouthed Kwaaikie, without provocation resorted to calling Malumba “n swart bobejaan” (a black baboon) in his native Afrikaans.
Malumba did not take kindly to his newly acquired identity and almost took the law into his own hands, charging at his intruder with intent, only to be restrained by his teammates.

Local rugby pundits argue that the one-year suspension imposed on Kwaaikie by his club, Wanderers, is just a gentle rap on the knuckles, considering the severity of the offense and challenged the NRU to impose harsher sanctions to deter would-be offenders.

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