Kuvikiland water system to be expanded

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Tsumeb

The Kuvikiland informal settlement’s water supply system will be expanded in the 2016/17 financial year to cater for the growing population of the settlement.

Currently the available water points can no longer serve the thousands of people living at the settlement as the population has increased significantly over the years, to such an extent that some individuals have encroached into nearby mines.

“Initially the municipality allocated about 350 plots at the settlement, but the population has grown tremendously and some people are now dwelling in the mine space, which it is not welcomed by the mines. However we are busy negotiating with the nearby mines if they could spare a small portion where we can accommodate the informal settlement residents,” said Tsumeb mayor Veueza Kasiringua.

She said that despite being aware of the huge population beyond the designated municipal area, the municipality will only extend its water programme to the initially designated areas.

The areas beyond the municipal boundaries will not currently benefit from the programme as they are not under the municipality’s jurisdiction.

The settlement uses a prepaid water system whereby residents have key tokens, which need to be recharged with a certain amount to be functional.

“We have realised that people are fetching water from very far,” she said.
Kasiringua further touched on other developments slated for the town such as the establishment of a tourism facility that will serve as an information centre and house cultural artefacts, thus promoting the town to potential investors.

This plan will complement the existing cultural arts centre and museum.
“We want to sell our town’s beauty and cultural heritage to people, which will help us attract investors and thus lift the town’s economy through the tourists that will be passing through,” said Kasiringua.

She cited as an example the current group of Norwegian students who are in the country on an educational exchange programme. They will have a story to tell once they go back home, she said. “Which is good for marketing the country.”

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