Impact of Language on Education Policy

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By Chief Ankama

(Part II)

The significance of comparing the Namibian indigenous languages in education to the study of Fillmore is hypothetically valid in some ways, e.g.
the study discovered that the learning of English as a second language by young children, changes the patterns of primary language use and leads to a possible primary language loss (p. 341). Fillmore argues: “When parents are unable to talk to their children, they cannot easily convey to them their values, beliefs, understanding or wisdom about how to cope with their experiences.

They cannot teach them about the meaning of work, or about personal responsibility, or what it means to be a moral or ethical person?

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