Reading Culture Still Lacking

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By Frederick Philander

WINDHOEK

Books and reading books play a pivotal and important role in the entire education process of the country.

This is the opinion of George Elia Kaiyamo, a member of the National Assembly, who was the keynote speaker on World Book Day. A fairly large audience attended the event in the capital at the public library on Saturday.

“The main aim of World Book Day set aside by UNESCO on April 23 shows the world body’s commitment to promote reading, publishing and the protection of intellectual property through copyright. It is also aimed at encouraging people to explore the pleasures of books and reading,” Kaiyamo educationally moralized.

According to him World Book Day is little known to the Namibian society.
“It is important and good for people to talk about books the same way they talk about things like soccer in our society. We also need to raise the level of buying and reading books because reading develops one’s imagination besides providing information,” he said.

Currently, there is a gap between countries when it comes to access to books.

“This gap is a reflection of the literacy rate of areas and also has a bearing on literacy, which is not the only barrier to reading. There exists a host of other factors that play a role. Whatever those factors, we must break them down one by one if we want to create and promote a reading culture in the country,” the former teacher said.

He also stressed the fact that reading is not only for a select few in the society.

“The whole society should be sensitized about the need to read, especially parents, who should encourage their children to read. Namibian schools should play a bigger role in molding learners into avid readers. This can be achieved if teachers encourage learners to consult books to complement what was taught in class. Reading should become a matter of must for a fruitful life,” he advised.

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