X-mas Package From Studio Omalaeti

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Confidence Musariri WINDHOEK In a first of its kind in Namibia, John Walenga’s Omalaeti Studio has released six albums as an Xmas present for the locals. Famed for the Stay Alert album, which features President Pohamba, Omalaeti Studio has gone a step further by producing the albums, which will surely satisfy Namibians of all walks of life. The albums were released on the same day and are expected to be launched very soon, “after rocking Namibia first without any formal introduction”, said executive producer John Walenga. Oshitenda by Tate Buti This time singing without his sister Janice, Tate Buti’s latest is a real iron as suggested by the title. The title track Oshitenda proves the man’s prowess without Janice’s voice. Mr Kwiku as he is now to be called, Tate Buti’s album shows maturity and class, and one cannot resist the jazz feeling mixed with a rhumba beat. Listen to Chessa Kwiku for some get-downs, as the bald man really gets it going on track 11. Track 8 is a funny Letter To Buti which will leave you in stitches. Award winning reggae-boy, La Chox features on track 12 with Castro and Sis Janice also featuring in some tracks, to make it a cheerful Christmas present. Okambwila is certain to explode at Omulunga Radio. 2nd Half by Pablo d’ablo o’outlaw It’s indeed the second half for Mr Alles Mumwe, never underestimate the Outlaw. Pablo continues from where he left in his first album. This time it’s a 14-track album, whose first song can be misread to be Vee’s Taku Taku. Kalibantu is a soothing calypso track with Pablo rhyming in a typical Kasumba Kasamba. Pablo however recedes the tempo as the tracks roll on, as he tries to accommodate all music genres, from Kwaito, Rap, R&B, Hip Hop, a move which has both negative and positive effects for his fans. Track 5, Vetkoek is a well-mastered Afrikaans masterpiece. If you want to laugh listen to Rakuraz. Ondjego all is good. Om’fuko by Pedrito Three stars to producer Pedrito, for singing something distant from the traditional Kwaito. Om’fuko is good, they say never judge a book by its cover but with Om’fuko one can be tempted to do just that. The cover is well designed. Come to the track, this album opens with a duet where an employee and the employer are trying to do the impossible, reasoning together. It’s like a party album, where you start in a jovial dancing mood and end up clutching your loved one by the hand on the dance floor, trying to feel the rhythm of their heart. Track 13 is for the pride of the North, Oshakati Shetu – no doubt the album will go platinum in the North. Track 7, Mo Party needs no further explanation. However, the dent in Pedrito’s recipe is the too many talk-ins, the artist seems comfortable with having more talk than music. For instance track 1 and Paulusa Paulusa and the Father, track 16. Whoever told Pedrito that his voice tallies with his music was right. Some of Pedrito’s pieces can be thought to be foreign because of the quality, until one listens to the Oshiwambo language. Well crafted. While You Are Here An instrumental album for the mature at heart. Features some traditional gospel tunes like Be Still and Kalunga Ohole, but this time only instrumental. The 21-track album is a nice desert to listen to on a Sunday afternoon. ! Ngai Xu -1 and Think are some of the tunes to listen to when one is down. The album celebrates the worthiness of Namibian music. Omtima Wange by Pedrito Pedrito’s fans will have complications on which album to buy, as both Omtima Wange and Om’fuko are explosive. This particular album features songs like Omshiyakano, Kalunga Ohole, Lilongekideni and Uukuni Kumwe. It is also a potential chart-buster from Omalaeti.